Nobody Cares! … or do they?

A desperate chorus rises each year as spring turns into summer, and wildlife rehabilitators across the country approach or reach capacity.

It can be nearly impossible in many parts of the United States to find help for wildlife emergencies at this time of year (wildlife baby season and migration). This is tragic for the animals who need help, and it’s tragic for the good humans who are trying to help them.

A familiar refrain of frustration returns to social media, email inboxes, and voicemail messages from the would-be rescuers: Nobody cares!

We created Animal Help Now specifically because of the difficulty of finding wildlife emergency assistance in the United States (though, to be sure, it’s a planet-wide problem). With our app we have solved the problem of finding the closest and most appropriate help for wildlife emergencies – and conflicts! – but that doesn’t mean more help is available. It doesn’t mean this country has suddenly developed an appreciation for wildlife rehabilitation. It doesn’t mean wildlife agencies are making it easier to rehabilitate wildlife. It doesn’t mean government funding is available to support rehabilitation centers and hotlines.

It doesn’t mean our communities have come together to develop systemic approaches to mitigating the ubiquitous anthropogenic threats (cat and dog attacks, window strikes, motor vehicle strikes, poorly executed “nuisance” wildlife control, etc.) that result in millions of wild animals getting injured and killed in the United States every day.

Wildlife ambulances should not be the stuff of science fiction.

As your stomach turns and you jump into action after hearing the dreaded thump of a bird hitting a window, seeing a bleeding and broken-shelled turtle in the road, encountering your neighbor’s outdoor cat with a bird in her mouth, you know instantly that you will need help as quickly as possible. And it is gut-wrenchingly tragic (to the empathetic among us) that sometimes there simply is no help. When no help is available, when your only option might be to find a veterinarian who will euthanize the animal, you are rightly anguished, sad, angry….

And you may lash out. Nobody cares!

But of course that’s not true. You care. The hundreds of people looking for help for another animal in need in some other place but at the exact same time you are – they care. The volunteers who do the work to get licensed to rehabilitate wildlife and who often work out of their homes, covering their own expenses, doing their best to get phone calls returned between feedings, having compromised sleep for months on end – they care. The paid staff and volunteers serving wildlife rehabilitation centers, rescues, and hotlines care. The veterinarians who are willing to stabilize wildlife care. Many wildlife and law enforcement agents care.

AHNow’s volunteers, paid staff, and financial supporters care.

It may be fair to say that more people care than do not!

We simply must make this a safer world for wildlife and lift up wildlife rehabilitation where it belongs. Animal Help Now lays it out in its vision statement.

Animal Help Now envisions a world in which humans:

  • Respect wildlife
  • Are familiar with threats facing wildlife and act to minimize them
  • Are educated about wildlife emergencies and empowered to effectively help orphaned, injured and distressed wild animals
  • Are educated about living in harmony with wildlife and empowered to effectively and humanely resolve human/wildlife conflicts
  • Place high value on the services provided by wildlife rehabilitators, humane wildlife conflict operators and other wildlife experts

This is going to take a society-wide effort, from businesses to HOAs to all levels of government. State legislatures and state wildlife agencies and the commissions that direct them, in particular, can and must do better. More than enough people care. More than enough to effect such changes, that is. We just have to be better organized, better directed, and a bit quicker about it.

Guest Blog: Animal adoptions are up. Considering one? Read this first!

All around the world, people are spending more time at home. So it only makes sense that so many people are considering adding a dog, cat, or other animal companion to their families. After all, having an animal companion can be a win-win: the animal gets a home, and everyone gets love. As an added benefit for humans, especially during a pandemic, is the proven stress relief “pets” can provide. A stay-at-home order also gives us extra time to help new arrivals adjust to their new homes. 

Now, if you want to help wildlife, Animal Help Now has all of the resources you need. However, if you are thinking about adopting or fostering a domestic animal, the following FAQs should be helpful.

Foster? Adopt? Other?

From adopting to fostering to volunteering, there are countless ways to make a positive difference in the lives of dogs, cats, and other companion animals. 

Guidelines

How Can I Prepare My Home and Life for an Animal?

Whether you adopt or foster, you will need some basics to keep that new pet healthy and happy. 

How Can I Deal with Common New “Pet” Problems? 

Animals can take time to adjust and learn routines, so be prepared to stay calm and patient. In addition:

Helping a homeless animal can give you such an extra sense of purpose during the pandemic. Whether you have the time and resources to adopt, foster, or volunteer, consider making room in your life for animals in need.

Author: Aurora James, DogEtiquette.info

For further reading, see https://www.directline.com/pet-cover/magazine/rescue-animals.

Photo Credit: Pexels

We Mother

mother vt to give birth to, to give rise to, to care for or protect like a mother

Is it wrong for me to expand the concept of Mother’s Day? I hope not, ’cause here I go!

First off, a happy Mother’s Day to all of you who are mothers in the conventional sense. May your special day be filled with peace and love, and may you know your hard work is appreciated.

A happy Mother’s Day, too, to all of you who have found other or additional outlets for your maternal instincts. To you who work to make the world a better place. To you who mother the world or even the tiniest part of her as if she were your own child, day in, day out, year upon year upon year.

Animal Help Now is building out its board of directors and advisory council. We need mothers! We need people to care for our fledgling organization and nurture it into adulthood. We need leaders, workers, people with vision and determination.

Animal Help Now is more than a service that connects people who need help with animal emergencies with people who can provide such help. We are more than a wildlife 9-1-1.

Yes, Animal Help Now is the best service of its kind. But the organization also plays a crucial role in educating the public about mitigating threats to animals and strengthening the increasingly important bond between humans and wildlife and indeed all animals.

The organization this year is ramping up its collaborative work with humane wildlife conflict resolution professionals to teach and empower people to live more harmoniously with wildlife.

Just as sure as the world needs the best kids, the world needs the best nonprofits. And the best nonprofits have the best mothers.

Is your nest empty? Does it have room? If so, please let us know! And if another person comes to mind who might be good for a leadership role in Animal Help Now, please forward this email to her or him.

As always, thank you for reading and for your kind consideration. Have a great weekend!