Breaking a Habit of Abuse — The campaign to end the “Possum Drop” in western North Carolina

Co-Authored with Kathleen McCurdy, Concerned North Carolina Citizen and Member of Team Millie. Team Millie is a cooperative effort led by Animal Help Now and The Opossum’s Pouch Sanctuary, Rescue and Rehabilitation, seeking year-round protection for opossums in North Carolina.

A young, wild opossum spends hours suspended in a box above a group of New Year’s Eve revelers in a small town in western North Carolina. It’s still a few hours till midnight, at which time she will be lowered to the stage, in a misguided attempt to add a local flavor to New York’s Times Square “ball drop” tradition.

She is no doubt stressed from the cold and rainy weather, the loud music and fireworks, and most importantly the festering wound in her front left leg. According to a veterinarian who later examined and treated her, she would be in this box on this miserable night with a snapped bone in her leg, with blood flow to her foot severely restricted, and with an infection growing in the accompanying flesh wound. Rescuers who later that night got the opossum to safety said they could smell the infection from several feet away.

Although North Carolina law normally prohibits such treatment of wildlife, what is happening to this opossum is legal, because it is the New Year holiday. See, the North Carolina state legislature passed a law several years ago stripping the species of all protections over the New Year, all so that one family could have the go-ahead to continue profiting from a sad and cruel little western NC tradition called the “possum drop.”

It’s almost a year now since the injured and sick opossum was left dangling in the noise and cold for hours above that stage. Thanks to caring people who attended the event just to help the opossum, she received urgent veterinary attention shortly after her ordeal. The shy and gentle animal we now call Millie survived the abuse, though she will never recover from her injury. Her leg was amputated 10 days into the new year, despite her veterinarian’s every attempt to save it. 

Millie is learning to get around on three legs, though you can still see her left shoulder joint at work in its futile attempt to move her phantom limb. Click here to see the sad, but not graphic, video of Millie in recovery.

Millie also is slowly learning to trust her caregivers, which is important, as she will live out her life in a wildlife sanctuary, unable to ever return to her woodland home.

It’s worth noting here that publicity for the event states it’s OK for people to enjoy themselves because the animals aren’t harmed. Right.

“‘Possum Drop” promotional poster with “zone of lawlessness” making light of suspension of cruelty protections. The organizer’s website prominently proclaims, “We just want to let you know that we do ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to harm the ‘possum.”

Compassionate people and animal advocacy organizations have been working for years to put a permanent end to this practice, either legislatively or by convincing the organizers to abandon their anachronistic “fun.” The event has alternately traumatized, injured, and killed animals throughout its 25-year history. The fate of most animals will never be known, because after they’ve been captured, held, and subjected to a raucous crowd, they tend to be simply tossed back into the wild. Some have surely not survived and likely suffered prolonged deaths, including the one who was blinded in one eye during the five-day ordeal before being discarded. 

Millie may change all of that. She is the proverbial smoking gun. She is living, surviving proof that what happens at opossum “drops” is anything but good, clean fun.

We are hopeful that Millie’s experience will help North Carolina legislators come to their senses and ensure that what happened to Millie will never happen to another animal. Certainly the appalling treatment of Millie is the reason more than one 150 thousand people signed the petition calling for the repeal of the state’s inane “Be Cruel to Opossums” law.

In the meantime, a member of the Logan family has communicated to us that there will be yet another opossum drop this year in Brasstown.

How You Can Help

Visit www.JusticeForMillie.org, and see the suggested action items at the bottom of the page.

Of Opossum “Drops” and Less Obvious Affronts

Note: For an update on Millie, the opossum referenced below, and on the “opossum drop” itself, see our Nov 2019 blog, here.

The ridiculous, cruel and anachronistic opossum “drop” in Andrews, North Carolina, went ahead last night as planned (video).

Our hearts go out to the little one who was abused as this sad public “tradition” continued.

In his or her honor, I’ll humbly suggest we all think hard about how our own behaviors – our private “traditions”, perhaps – might harm others.

Is our own entertainment truly cruelty free? Any circus involving animals is not. Nor is any zoo or aquarium. Any movie involving actual animals likely was unpleasant for them; many have been downright cruel or indeed deadly.

Four film titles (Milo and Otis, Snowy River, Flicka and OldBoy)
A tiny sampling of movies in which animals either died or were abused during production.

The food that sustains us? Are we eating in a way that causes the least harm, to both animals and to the planet?

Chickens and fish suffer tremendously.
Food production on an industrial scale leaves no room for animal welfare. After living short, miserable lives, chickens may be scalded alive during slaughter. The fish in this scene are mostly alive. They were crushed as they were pulled in massive nets from their homes, and then this worker carelessly steps on them as they suffocate to death.

Our household products? Are we still buying products “tested” on animals? They’re certainly still being produced!

Products that test on animals, and a few animal test images
New and Improved? What we need is a new and improved ethic toward animals. We humans pride ourselves on our scientific accomplishments, but we continue to kill animals to meet some archaic regulation ostensibly protecting humans. From laundry soap to cotton swabs, our purchases matter!

Our investments? Are we supporting companies that exploit natural resources?

Are we cutting back on plastics? Even just a little?

In a room full of antagonists (say, NYE revelers), the persecuted protagonist (opossum) is easy to spot and easy to sympathize with.

Profound change starts with the more difficult recognition of when we ourselves are causing problems. And profound change can be gradual. A little less meat in our diets. A reusable drink container. A little more attention paid to our animal companion…

We have a whole year to stop the next opossum “drop”. Imagine all the other positive changes we can make during that time!