Of Opossum “Drops” and Less Obvious Affronts

The ridiculous, cruel and anachronistic opossum “drop” in Andrews, North Carolina, went ahead last night as planned (video).

Our hearts go out to the little one who was abused as this sad public “tradition” continued.

In his or her honor, I’ll humbly suggest we all think hard about how our own behaviors – our private “traditions”, perhaps – might harm others.

Is our own entertainment truly cruelty free? Any circus involving animals is not. Nor is any zoo or aquarium. Any movie involving actual animals likely was unpleasant for them; many have been downright cruel or indeed deadly.

Four film titles (Milo and Otis, Snowy River, Flicka and OldBoy)
A tiny sampling of movies in which animals either died or were abused during production.

The food that sustains us? Are we eating in a way that causes the least harm, to both animals and to the planet?

Chickens and fish suffer tremendously.
Food production on an industrial scale leaves no room for animal welfare. After living short, miserable lives, chickens may be scalded alive during slaughter. The fish in this scene are mostly alive. They were crushed as they were pulled in massive nets from their homes, and then this worker carelessly steps on them as they suffocate to death.

Our household products? Are we still buying products “tested” on animals? They’re certainly still being produced!

Products that test on animals, and a few animal test images
New and Improved? What we need is a new and improved ethic toward animals. We humans pride ourselves on our scientific accomplishments, but we continue to kill animals to meet some archaic regulation ostensibly protecting humans. From laundry soap to cotton swabs, our purchases matter!

Our investments? Are we supporting companies that exploit natural resources?

Are we cutting back on plastics? Even just a little?

In a room full of antagonists (say, NYE revelers), the persecuted protagonist (opossum) is easy to spot and easy to sympathize with.

Profound change starts with the more difficult recognition of when we ourselves are causing problems. And profound change can be gradual. A little less meat in our diets. A reusable drink container. A little more attention paid to our animal companion…

We have a whole year to stop the next opossum “drop”. Imagine all the other positive changes we can make during that time!