Great blue heron killed in wetlands.

Helping Wildlife During Hurricane Michael and Beyond

With Hurricane Michael hammering the Florida Panhandle and surrounding areas, we’re facing yet another harsh reminder of the fragility of life. We know you join Animal Help Now in our hopes that those in the hurricane’s path can make it to safety and ensure that their dependents do, too.

Sadly, we were reminded just last month that many animals are simply left to die, including not only dogs and cats, and fishes in aquariums, but also and on a much, much larger scale, pigs and chickens and other “food” animals, whose anonymity dooms them.

As to wild animals and wild places, even with their millions of years of evolutionary toughening-up, many can offer no contest to the violence of today’s storms.

Great Blue Heron killed in Hurricane Harvey.
Many shorebirds seeking shelter in local wetlands, like this great blue heron, were devastated by storm surge in Hurricane Harvey (Port Aransas, TX). Many of those who were found alive and rescued were taken to the Texas Sealife Center for medical attention and rehabilitation. Photo: Tim Tristan.
Rescued green sea turtles.
Green sea turtles transported to the Texas Sealife Center in Corpus Christi after Hurricane Harvey. More than 50 sea turtles were housed and cared for at the facility. Photo: Tim Tristan.

The climate is changing, and the impacts are larger and coming at us faster than almost anyone predicted. As the International Panel on Climate Change reported last week, we need to act now, as in now, as in right now. Today.

As to today: at Animal Help Now, we recognize the huge role that human food systems play in climate change. Choosing to eat lower on the food chain is perhaps the single most important thing a person can do each day to positively impact the climate. When we farm to feed humans directly instead of farming to feed cows and pigs and chickens to then feed to humans, we use less fossil fuel and we require less farmland. I can almost hear a rainforest saying, Thank you.

Inundated factory farm.
Millions of chickens and thousands of pigs suffered terribly and died during Hurricane Florence. This is about as close as cameras are allowed. Photo: USA Today.

What’s that, coral reef? Plant-based diets also benefit coral reefs, not only from a global warming perspective, but also by rejecting factory fishing and its concomitant destruction of marine biodiversity.

Discarded fishing line and nets alone are reason enough for Animal Help Now to exist.

Brown pelican.
Through the unparalleled devastation of Hurricane Harvey, some animals remained resilient. Here, a surviving brown pelican. Photo: Tim Tristan.
Bunnies orphaned during Hurricane Harvey.

But the maelstrom of human misbehavior has much larger consequences, as we are now witnessing in the Gulf.

This week Animal Help Now has been busy ensuring our list of wildlife experts in and around the Florida Panhandle is up to date so we can best serve people who encounter wildlife in need as the storm moves through.

Of course, most area wildlife rehabilitators have rightfully left for higher ground, serving as a final jolting reminder that each of us needs to act today to mitigate the severity of storms of the future. If we don’t, we’ll all soon find ourselvesĀ in a constant state of retreat.

Use Animal Help Now (website, iPhone app, Android app) to find assistance right now for injured or distressed wildlife.

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