Resources

Additional information that may help you help an animal in need:

Please visit our feedback page to let us know how we can improve this content.

Very few helpers are showing up in the results.

Out of respect for rehabbers' privacy, we do not list rehabbers' phone numbers outside of default hours, which are set to 9am to 8pm, 7 days a week. Every day rehabbers log in to our system and provide us with their actual hours of operation, which often are longer than what we indicated by default. During these early days of Animal Help Now's national wildlife functionality, if you are calling outside of the hours of 9am to 6pm, you may not see all of the rehabbers in your area. We do, however, provide you with a way to see all area rehabbers. To do so, click the View All Available Facilities button at the top of the helper list on search results, or by tapping All in Area on the iPhone.

The helpers weren't helpful.

If the helpers you contacted were unhelpful and you are involved with an animal issue that may benefit from the involvement of an advocacy organization. A list of such organizations is provided at the bottom of this page.

How do I tell if a wild animal is orphaned or if the parents are simply out of sight?

Always remember that baby wild animals left alone for long periods of time (up to 14 hours), may not have been abandoned. Do not interfere unless you are certain the animal has been abandoned or separated from her mother. Rabbits have very large digestive organs that store enough milk that the mother returns just twice each day to feed the infant. Deer and other animals may exhibit similar behavior. For more advice, see the Greenwood Wildlife and Rehabilitation Center web site.

Should I try to rehabilitate a wild animal?

Never attempt to rehabilitate wildlife by yourself. As a rule, you must have a license to treat wildlife. Rehabilitating wildlife without a license often places undue risk upon the animal. Animals have very specific needs that often only the experts know and can accommodate.

Still, a situation may require that you provide short-term, temporary care for an animal in need. For specific instructions based on the type of animal, please see the Greenwood Wildlife and Rehabilitation Center web site.

None of the vets I contacted will help with my wildlife issue. What should I do?

In our wildlife results we list veterinarians who have indicated a willingness to help wildlife. If you cannot find a veterinarian who will help you, go back to the home page and tap or click Emergency Vets, and the contact these to see if you can get help.

How do I capture and transport a wild animal?

Always remember to exercise safety and caution when helping animals. Even though your intentions are good, many animals – especially wild ones – may perceive you as a threat.

Understand that approaching an animal without proper preparation can result in injury to yourself and/or bring further harm upon the animal.

Whenever possible, consult the experts we direct you to before approaching or handling an animal. Their understanding of animal health and behavior has the power to spare you and the animal both trouble and harm.

If you are unable to reach an expert, please refer to the instructions provided by Greenwood Wildlife and Rehabilitation Center for the most appropriate way to capture and transport an animal. If you do not have access to the internet, brief capture and transport instructions are provided below.

DO NOT attempt to capture or transport an animal unless you believe it is absolutely critical to his health and survival. For an injured animal, the shock and fear associated with being handled may be enough to kill him. Further, a frightened animal can cause you harm.

DO NOT attempt to capture or transport rabies vector species, including foxes, skunks, raccoons, groundhogs, and bats, without specific instruction from an expert. Even a small scratch can result in a fatal case of rabies and will almost certainly result in the animal being killed to determine whether or not she has rabies.

Please understand that the risk of disease accompanies handling most animals. Rodents, for instance, may carry a host of communicable diseases. Exercise the utmost caution when handling or capturing an animal.

If you find yourself in a situation where you believe you must capture an animal for the sake of her health and survival, and you have so far been unable to reach an expert, follow the instructions below:

  1. Try to minimize direct contact with the animal. Always wear protective clothing, including gloves and long sleeves to protect against bites and scratches.
  2. Find a well-ventilated, enclosed box or animal carrier and line it with something absorbent, including newspaper, clean sheets, or t-shirts. Refrain from using garments with loose knit or frayed edges, as these can actually be harmful to the animal.
  3. With a cloth or t-shirt in hand, approach the animal from behind and gently but securely grab hold of her. Keeping the animal covered minimizes stress and keeps you protected. Then carefully place her in the box or carrier you have chosen. If you are trying to catch a bird, butterfly nets can be useful.
  4. Place the box or carrier in someplace quiet and dark. DO NOT handle the animal unless absolutely necessary, as this causes stress and can lead to shock, and potentially death. If you are unable to transport the animal, place a heating pad underneath half of the box, though you should not do so on a hot day. DO NOT feed or give water to the animal. Forcing an injured animal to drink water could kill her, and if she gets wet she could suffer hypothermia and die.
  5. Refrain from administering any type of treatment unless the animal is bleeding severely. In such a situation, apply steady, gentle pressure to stop the bleeding. DO NOT apply a tourniquet.
  6. Once you are ready to transport the animal, place the carrier on the floor of your car, and keep the car warm and quiet. Avoid sudden stops and sharp turns. DO NOT let anyone, especially a child, hold the animal in his or her lap during the trip. If the animal is too large or too heavy for a carrier, simply wrapping him in a blanket and placing him in a stable location – such as the back of an SUV or van – may be the best option.

Can I get help transporting wildlife?

Some rehabbers will assist with transportation. In Colorado, the Division of Parks and Wildlife trains and manages volunteer wildlife transport teams. Call (970) 389-5203 for more information.

Animal Help Now wants to hear from you! Please contact us if you have information regarding wildlife transportation services in your state or region.

I'm challenged with a wildlife conflict (deer in garden, skunk under porch, etc.). Please help!

Given time, patience and occasionally money, all wildlife conflicts can be managed humanely. Here are a few resources to help:

Animal Help Now wants to hear from you! Please contact us if you have information regarding services that specialize in humanely resolving human/wildlife conflicts in your state or region.

I need companion animal assistance outside of Texas and Colorado.

Animal Help Now’s wildlife functionality is currently available across the entire United States. The full version of Animal Help Now, available in Texas, Colorado, and within 50 miles of the Colorado border, allows people to find help for any type of animal – wild or domestic.

The following resources will be of use in other areas of the United States.

  • For an emergency veterinarian, Google "emergency veterinarian [your city] [your state]"
  • For assistance with an immediate threat to an animal’s life, call 911.
  • For assistance with an animal-related threat to a person’s life, call 911.
  • To report abuse or neglect, call your county sheriff. Sheriffs are prepared to either assist you directly or to connect you with agencies that may be of assistance.
  • For assistance with lost companion animals (pets), tap or click here.
  • For assistance with found companion animals, tap or click here.
  • For assistance with other pet issues or farmed animal issues, contact PETA or HSUS.

My companion animal (my pet) is lost. I want to do everything in my power to find him. Please help!

Fast action is critical when an animal goes missing.

Call all area animal shelters and animal control agencies. (Use the Animal Help Now program to locate these.)

Post a “missing pet” profile on one or more of the many websites listed here, which provide resources for people who have lost companion animals:

If an animal is lost due to a disaster (hurricane, wildfire, etc.), you can also search Facebook for temporary pages set up to reunite animals with their guardians. Use keywords such as "lost and found animals" or "lost and found pets" along with words that describe the location or name of the disaster (e.g., "Lost and Found Pets Black Forest Wildfire").

Print and distribute posters with the words “LOST DOG”, “LOST CAT”, etc. in large lettering at the top. Include a large photograph, the animal’s name, and a photograph or physical description. Don’t rely on simply listing the breed of the animal, as many people will not be familiar with certain breeds. Offer a reward, but do not mention the amount. Also be sure to include your phone number.

Also consider placing a “Lost” ad in your local newspaper the morning after your companion animal goes missing.

You may wish to distribute notecards to individuals in the neighborhood. Place them underneath your neighbors’ doors or on the windshields of their cars.

Speak to anyone you see about your lost companion. Ask them to look inside outdoor buildings such as sheds and barns, as the animal may be afraid and looking for places to hide. Also try to search the neighborhood with family and friends, calling your companion animal’s name.

Be aggressive and proactive in your search. Check local shelters by visiting them; do not assume staff members know your animal well enough to distinguish him from the rest.

Call all local police and state troopers, all boarding houses, dog training clubs and groomers, and the highway department. Call veterinarians and animal hospitals both in your area and in all surrounding areas; often someone will find a stray and drive many miles to a clinic.

If you find your companion animal outside and she appears afraid or hesitant, do not chase her. She is likely much faster than you and will escape. Instead, sit on the ground and speak in a normal tone, calling the animal’s name and saying familiar words and phrases.

It is important to have clear photographs of your companion animal on hand in case you need them. Always make sure the animal is wearing a collar and tags displaying current contact information.

I found someone’s companion animal (pet). What are all the steps I should take to be sure I reunite her with her guardian (owner)?

Warning: Handling an animal can be dangerous to you and harmful for the animal. We urge you to exercise caution and good judgment when handling an animal.

Be sure to look closely at any tags on her collar. Make a note of any identification numbers, and dial any phone numbers you find. The TagTrace website has helpful hints about how to make full use of tag information.

Be sure to notify the shelter or shelters in the area in which you found the animal. (Use the Animal Help Now program to locate these.) If you are concerned the animal may not be claimed and therefore don’t want to take the animal to a shelter, you should still contact the shelter in the location the animal was found and file a “home” report.

Check lost and found websites to see if someone is looking for the animal:

In addition, the TagTrace website has helpful hints about how to make full use of tag information. And if you see a QR barcode (see the BarkCode website for more info) on a tag, scan it with your smartphone, if possible.

Further, www.lost-petz.com offers an iPhone app for pet Amber Alerts.

If the animal was likely lost due to a disaster (hurricane, wildfire, etc.), you can also search Facebook for temporary pages set up to reunite animals with their guardians. Use keywords such as "lost and found animals" or "lost and found pets" along with words that describe the location or name of the disaster (e.g., "Lost and Found Pets Black Forest Wildfire").

Note: Very few resources are available for found farmed animals. If you find a farmed animal in Colorado, contact the Larimer County Humane Society or the Animal Action Network. If you find a farmed animal elsewhere, contact an animal advocacy organization.

If the animal is injured, call an emergency veterinarian to ask for advice about how to care for the animal. If you are unable to reach a clinic, or need additional advice, follow these instructions.

If you take the animal to a vet, be aware that you may be financially responsible for her care. Veterinarians in Animal Help Now results have not agreed to provide free vet care.

If you turn a found animal over to a shelter or an animal control agency, you will not be financially responsible for their care.

Because an injured animal may be in a great deal of pain – and when in pain even the gentlest animals can act unpredictably – you must take care to protect yourself against bites and scratches. Even if you know the animal, she can still pose a danger to both you and herself. Keep your face away from any injured animal’s mouth and claws.

Before attempting to move an injured companion animal, check to see if she is conscious, breathing, or bleeding. If a cat or dog is not breathing, nose to mouth resuscitation can be administered by sealing the mouth and lips shut and breathing into her nose to inflate the lungs.

If the animal is bleeding profusely, apply direct pressure to the wound with a shirt or cloth.

Wrap the animal’s head in a cloth, towel, or shirt. This serves to minimize stress on the animal, and helps keep you from getting bitten.

NEVER muzzle a vomiting animal, as this could cause her to choke and die. Cats and other small animals can be wrapped in towels to restrain them, but make sure not to wrap the animal so tightly she experiences pain or difficulty breathing.

Fractures are common in traumatic situations, so it is important to be VERY careful when moving an injured animal. Place the animal on a board, door, or any solid surface before moving her. DO NOT try to splint a broken bone unless instructed to do so by an expert; this can lead to further harm to the animal.

Bring the animal to a veterinary facility as soon as possible, but make sure to call as far in advance as possible to let them know you need emergency care.

I need to evacuate animals from my home/property.

The responsibility for coordinating animal evacuation and sheltering during a disaster falls to the local government (city or county) in charge of the incident. Should the local government order animal evacuation or make sheltering available, notice to the public should be provided on local television, radio, or your local government's website.

If you need help evacuating animals, look to local television, radio or your local government’s website right now for assistance.

If you are evacuating your own pets:

  1. Secure your animals in a cage or carrier and get them away from danger. Be sure to keep your pets contained on a leash or in a carrier at all times to prevent them from running away.
  2. Retrieve your emergency supply kit. If you do not have an emergency supply kit:

    • Keep identification including collar, ID tag and pet license on/with dogs and cats at all times.
    • Take along any medications and if possible the food your animal eats.
  3. For temporary shelter, check with your local government or contact kennels, nearby hotels/motels that accept pets, or friends or relatives outside your immediate area. This page contains RedRover's links to pet-friendly accommodations.

Our thanks to RedRover and the Humane Society of Boulder Valley for much of the content in this answer.

I lost/found an animal during a disaster.

For help with animals lost during/after a disaster, click here. For help with animals found during/after a disaster, click here. Be sure to read all the way to the bottom of the topic.

How can I best prepare to protect my companion animals in the event of a house fire or other catastrophic event at my home?

1. Microchip your pets.

Make sure your pets are microchipped and wear collars and tags with up-to-date information. Microchip identification is one of the best ways to ensure that you and your pet are reunited if you are separated. Be sure to keep the microchip registration up-to-date, and include at least one emergency number of a friend or relative who resides out of your immediate area.

2. Post a rescue alert sticker at an entrance to your home.

Make sure it would be visible to rescue workers. It should include the types and number of pets in your home, as well as the name and phone number of your vet. Free emergency pet alert stickers can be found online.

3. Arrange a safe haven for your pets.

This might be a kennel, a local animal shelter, a nearby hotel/motel that accepts pets, or friends or relatives outside your immediate area.

RedRover provides links to pet-friendly accommodations, as well as additional resources for disaster preparedness.

Note: Animal Help Now provides a list of the nearest animal shelters.

4. Use the buddy system.

Exchange pet information, evacuation plans and house keys with a few trusted neighbors or nearby friends. If you’re caught outside evacuation lines when an evacuation order is issued, your neighbors or friends can evacuate your pets for you.

5. Keep an emergency supply kit ready.

6. Finally, for governmental emergency response in Colorado, or to sign up for alerts, tap or click here.

Our thanks to RedRover and the ASPCA for much of this content.

I need to transport an animal. What do I need to know?

Warning: Handling an animal can be dangerous to you and harmful for the animal. We urge you to exercise caution and good judgment when handling an animal.

Place the animal inside a portable carrier during the ride to the shelter. Because all animals respond differently to traveling inside a moving vehicle, this is one way you can minimize the risk of the animal becoming upset and unmanageable.

If you do not own a carrier, you may be able to fashion one out of a box or plastic tub. Make sure that it has large enough holes or open spaces to allow the animal to breathe.

Once the animal is inside the vehicle, strap the carrier to the center seat in back with a seatbelt. If the carrier is too large for a seatbelt, place it in a stable location in the back of an SUV or van with a safe, strong, wire mesh installed between the cargo and seating areas. This will prevent the animal from distracting you while driving or from being thrown into the front seat in the event of an accident or sudden stop.

If you are unable to provide a carrier of any kind, or the animal is too large or too heavy for a carrier, you may place him in the cargo area.

WARNING: DO NOT place the animal in the bed of a pickup truck. This is unsafe for the animal and a potential safety risk for other drivers.

If you are unable to move the animal because you do not have access to transportation, first call the shelters in your area to find out if they have staff that can pick up the animal. If they are unable to assist you, some companies specialize in transporting animals, including www.TLCPetTransport.com and www.animalsaway.com.

If the Animal Is Injured

Your objective when transporting an injured animal is to ensure that no further harm comes to him, and that your safety and the safety of others is not at risk.

It is best to wrap the animal in a blanket or cloth and place him inside a portable carrier for the ride to the vet. Because all animals act differently when traveling inside a moving vehicle, this is one way you can minimize the risk of the animal becoming upset and unmanageable.

If you do not own a carrier, you may be able to fashion one out of a box or plastic tub. Make sure that it has large enough holes or open spaces to allow the animal to breathe.

If the animal is too large or too heavy for a carrier, simply wrap him in a blanket and place him in a stable location, such as the back of an SUV or van. It is best to use a vehicle that has a safe, strong, wire mesh installed between the cargo and seating areas. This will prevent the animal from distracting you while driving or from being thrown into the front seat in the event of an accident or sudden stop.

If you are unable to provide a carrier of any kind, or the animal is too large or too heavy for a carrier, you may place him in the cargo area.

WARNING: DO NOT place the animal in the bed of a pickup truck. This is unsafe for the animal and a potential safety risk for other drivers.

I need to keep a companion animal (pet) overnight. What do I need to know?

If you have found a companion animal and you must board her overnight, be cautious and make sure to protect yourself from potential harm. Even animals that seem friendly may exhibit unpredictable behavior in unfamiliar situations. Protect yourself against bites, scratches, and disease by minimizing contact with the animal and wearing protective clothing such as gloves and long sleeves. DO NOT allow children near the animal.

Minimize stress on the animal as much as possible.

If the Animal Is Injured

Have you tried contacting a mobile vet? To do so, go to the home page, tap or click the Pet or Farmed Animal Issues link, indicate that you cannot transport the animal, and answer the subsequent questions. Your results will include all nearby mobile veterinarians.

Be sure to leave a message if you cannot reach the veterinarian. Many mobile veterinarians use their voice mail to handle all incoming calls. Many operate in remote areas with limited coverage and depend on cell phones. You also may wish to call an emergency veterinarian and ask for advice about how to care for the animal.

If you are unable to reach a clinic, or need additional advice, follow the instructions below.

Be cautious, even if you know the animal. She can still pose a danger to both you and herself. An injured animal may be in a great deal of pain, and the actions of even the gentlest animals can be unpredictable. Take care to protect yourself against bites and scratches. Keep your face away from any injured animal’s mouth and claws.

I can’t get an animal to a vet. What do I do?

We do include mobile veterinarians in our results. If you don’t see one, go to the home page, tap or click the Pets and Farmed Animals link, indicate that you cannot transport the animal, and answer the subsequent questions. Your results will include all nearby mobile veterinarians.

An animal has ingested poison.

Always bring the animal to a veterinary clinic and consult a poison control hotline if you suspect an animal has ingested a toxic substance.

Be aware that hours or even days may pass before an animal shows symptoms of poisoning. Remember to get help as soon as possible. The difference between life and death could be determined by seconds or minutes.

Your veterinarian will likely be able to provide assistance and/or advice about what to do in this situation, but you also may call the Pet Poison Hotline (800) 213-6680 or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, (888) 426-4435. There will be a fee attached to phone consultation at poison control centers.

Collect as much information as possible about the substance ingested, including a sample and/or ingredient list of the poisonous material, as well as any material the animal may have vomited or chewed. Doing so may provide the information a veterinarian needs in order to treat the animal.

I have witnessed (or am witnessing) cruelty or neglect. What can I do to ensure I’m taken seriously?

Write down what you witnessed, including dates and times. If possible, document the incident using photography or video. When filing a report, be sure to note all agencies you contacted, the names of the persons you spoke with, and the details and outcomes of your conversations.

Domestic Violence

To get help for animals involved in domestic violence, see RedRover.org/Domestic.

Dogs in Hot Cars

Animal Help Now recommends calling 911 for dogs left in hot cars. RedRover has an excellent website devoted to this issue, mydogiscool.com. Visit this site for fliers, other literature and helpful educational ideas.

I am concerned about animal cruelty depicted in photographs, videos or on the internet.

If you are offended by images or scenes depicting animal abuse or cruelty in a movie or television show, your best course of action may be to contact the network or publisher responsible for the content. Unfortunately, many such depictions are considered constitutionally protected free speech. You also may wish to contact the American Humane Association Movie and Television Unit, which oversees the use of live animals in television and movies.

If you know of a website that displays videos depicting cruelty to animals, file a report with the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Department of Justice.

If possible, get screen captures of the content.

An animal is in the road. What should I do?

If you encounter an animal in the road or on the shoulder while driving and you have time to avoid hitting her, tap your brakes (so your brake lights flash), sound your horn, and flash your headlights to scare off the animal and to warn other drivers behind and in front of you.

If you are driving through an area where animal traffic is likely, be especially careful at dusk and dawn, when many animals venture out to eat.

At night, use your high-beams as often as possible, and try to be aware of any activity alongside the road. If you spot a deer in the distance, flash your lights on and off several times. Deer fixate on headlights, so this may cause the animal to flee.

If you encounter a herd of animals in the road, call 911 or contact the county sheriff. If you won’t be putting yourself at risk, attempt to frighten the animals off the road.

An animal is wandering around my neighborhood. What should I do?

The general approach to unfamiliar dogs is to see if you can get the owner's (guardian's) information from tags on the collar and to get the animal into a confined space such as a fenced-in yard. If you sense the animal may be dangerous, contact law enforcement/animal control immediately and consider alerting your neighbors.

Whenever you see a lost or stray animal, be on the lookout for “Lost” posters. You also may wish to consult one or more of the following websites, which help people find lost companion animals:

In addition, the TagTrace website has helpful hints about how to make full use of tag information. And if you see a QR barcode (see the BarkCode website for more info) on a tag, scan it with your smartphone, if possible.

Further, www.lost-petz.com offers an iPhone app for pet Amber Alerts.

A cat is on a utility pole. What can I do?

If you have exhausted the options provided to you through the Animal Help Now program, including attempting to enlist the help of an animal advocacy group, here are some things you can try.

Sometimes a utility company will help by providing staff, vehicles, nonconductive extension poles and other safety equipment. They don’t usually provide this service but sometimes will if there is enough public outcry of concern for the cat.

Some fire departments respond to these calls, but this is the exception and not the rule. A tree trimmer truck with hydraulic bucket is also a possibility. Some heavy equipment rental companies may be willing to help.

Another option is to park a recreational vehicle (RV) or other high-profile vehicle next to the pole to decrease the distance the cat would jump or fall.

Other options include holding a net (sheets, blankets, beach towels, etc.) and forcing the cat off the perch. A more passive approach is to put padding (mattresses, towels, pillows, etc.) around the base of the pole to cushion the cat's landing if he/she jumps or falls.

Smelly food may tempt the cat off the perch, but it also may attract wildlife or other animals that might deter the cat from coming down. Very little is known about the effectiveness of putting out food for a cat in a situation such as this.

If you need to generate public support, shoot and distribute photographs.

Rescue Kit – For Car or Home!

Here are some items you'll want to have on hand for the next time you encounter an animal in need:

  • Paper grocery bag for transport of small animals
  • Cardboard box or collapsible pet carrier
  • Thick work gloves
  • Tight-weave towel
  • First aid kit
  • Multi-use tool
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Flashlight
  • Fishing net (for birds replace net with light cloth)
  • Dog leash and collar
  • Dog treats
  • Traffic cones (collapsible cones are available)
  • AnimalHelpNow! app
  • Bookmarked AHNow.org web site
  • Emergency Supply Kit - For Disasters/Evacuations
  • Emergency Supply Kit - For Disasters/Evacuations

    Here are some items you'll want to have on hand in case you need to evacuate your pet (companion animal):

    • Three to seven (3-7) days of food
    • Disposable litter trays and litter
    • Disposable garbage bags
    • Food bowl(s)
    • Extra collar/harness and leash
    • Two-week supply of medicine your pet requires
    • Bottled water
    • Travelling bag/crate/carrier for each pet
    • Blanket
    • Photos of your pets in case you become separated and need to make a “lost” poster
    • Copy of latest vaccination and health information
    • Pet’s license number and/or microchip number
    • For birds: Catch net, covering for the cage and cage liner
    • For birds: Spray bottle to moisten your bird’s feathers if the weather is hot
    • For snakes: Pillowcase for transportation. Be sure to have permanent and secure housing for him when you reach a safe place.
    • For snakes: Sturdy bowl for soaking
    • For snakes: Heating pad or other warming device such as a hot water bottle
    • For small animals: A week's worth of bedding materials

    Veterinarian's Guide to Injured Wildlife

    The Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association invites you to download a free copy of its Wildlife Care Basics for Veterinary Hospitals. This handbook was inspired by veterinary offices requesting information about how to temporarily treat and care for injured and orphaned wildlife. Because the needs of wildlife are so different from those of domestic animals, it became clear that there was a wide information gap that needed to be filled.

    To download, click here.

    How-To Videos

    Colorado Organizations

    Texas Organizations

    Other Organizations

    Careers Helping Animals

    A person can work for animals in a number of ways, and the opportunities will only increase as humans’ increasingly understand animals and their needs.

    Here is a sampling of animal-related work:

    • Wildlife biologists study animals in their natural habitat. One of them works in the conservation department at a zoo. Many if not most zoos direct a percentage of their budget - some a very small percentage and some as high as perhaps 40%! - to study animals in their native habitat in an effort to protect native ecosystems. Other wildlife biologists work for advocacy organizations, which raise public awareness about threats facing wildlife and sometimes bring lawsuits or help craft legislation to help animals. Some wildlife biologists work for government agencies.
    • Animal behaviorists (or “ethologists”) study animal behavior. Jane Goodall is an ethologist. So are Marc Bekoff (who studied coyotes and taught at a university) and Con Slobodchikoff (who has extensively documented the language of prairie dogs).
    • Many people work as veterinarians, veterinary technicians or wildlife rehabilitators.
    • Some lawyers put their degrees to work for animals. Animal law is an up and coming field. The Animal Legal Defense Fund is an organization dedicated to helping animals in the legal arena.
    • Thousands of people find positions in organizations that advocate for animals, including the Humane Society of the United States, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, Farm Sanctuary, and others. Positions at these organizations are the same as at any business, including administrative staff, graphic designers, accountants, public speakers, lobbyists, etc.
    • Some people teach animal-related classes at universities.
    • Many people work at animal shelters, as dog trainers, etc.
    • And several people hold regular jobs but volunteer their free time to help animals!

    Useful Career Resources

    Our thanks to Professor Leslie Irvine for much of the following information.